GRAPEVINE Old New Flower, Dangerous Garden, Moon Carrot, Missouri Elderberry, Chickadee Summer, Desert Garden, Secret Garden, Blue Chrysanthemum, Harvest Moon, Tree Tales, Garden Grows

tropidogyne pentaptera

Tropidogyne pentaptera. 100-million-year-old fossilized flower identified and named by OSU researchers George Poinar Jr. and Kenton Chambers. Photo George Poinar Jr., Oregon State University. See article from Science Daily below.

seseli gummiferum moon carrot rotary botanic wisconsin

The marvelous Moon Carrot, Seseli gummiferum. Photo Rotary Botanical Garden, Janesville, Wisconsin.

Botany is the school for patience, and its amateurs learn resignation from daily disappointments. – Thomas Jefferson, in a letter to Madame de Tessé (25 Apr 1788). From Thomas Jefferson Correspondence: Printed from the Originals (1916).

Seven complete specimens of new flower, all 100 million years old
“The amber preserved the floral parts so well that they look like they were just picked from the garden,” Poinar said. “Dinosaurs may have knocked the branches that dropped the flowers into resin deposits on the bark of an araucaria tree, which is thought to have produced the resin that fossilized into the amber.”
Science Daily

Step Inside the World’s Most Dangerous Garden (If You Dare)
The duchess thought she might want to include an apothecary garden, but a trip to Italy set her on a slightly different course. After visiting the infamous Medici poison garden, the duchess became enthralled with the idea of creating a garden of plants that could kill instead of heal.
Smithsonian

Moon Carrot
Seseli gummiferum is quirky, and definitely not quotidien.  There are only so many plants that look like endearingly awkward craft projects that any one garden can handle.
Louis the Plant Geek

The Missouri Elderberry
Nearly 2,400 years ago, Hippocrates called the elder plant “the medicine chest of the country people.” In fact, the elder leaf, flower, and berry can be used in salves, infusions, and syrups to relieve coughs, colic, diarrhea, sore throat, asthma, and the flu. And get this: You can chase mice away with an infusion made with fresh elder leaves or use elder flowers to soothe a burn. It’s a talented plant. And it’s native to Missouri.
Missouri Life

Midsummer at Chickadee Gardens
Peak flower season is upon us and, as I see the temperatures rising to record highs, I am reminded to observe what the garden has to offer. These flowers might not last long if our predicted 108 degree temperatures are realized this week, so it is time to enjoy.
Chickadee Gardens

The Wild Desert Garden
This past spring I witnessed the superbloom in the California deserts. It was a sensation.
Gardening Gone Wild

A Secret and Possibly Non-Existent Garden
For various reasons (which I frankly didn’t quite understand) the man who created this garden is no longer tending it: there was construction taking place in part of it. Maybe it had been sold? All I know is that the pictures you’re saying may be some of the last taken here, which should give them a certain added poignance…
Prairie Break

The Scientific Feat that Birthed the Blue Chrysanthemum
To make chrysanthemums blue, researchers from the National Agriculture and Food Research Organization inserted a gene from the bluish Canterbury bell into red mums. The presence of this gene modified anthocyanin in the mums, producing purplish flowers. To achieve a truer blue, the researchers added a second gene from the butterfly pea into the mix. That did the trick.
Smithsonian

11 Things to know about this year’s Harvest Moon
All full moons are special, but the Harvest Moon has some unique features that make this month’s moon a marvelous must-see.
Treehugger

Telling the Tales of Trees Around the World
Trees can live without us, but we cannot live without trees.
New York Times

As the Garden Grows
Looking at old photos of the garden can really bring home how much has changed in just a few years.
The Practical Plant Geek

It’s humbling to think that all animals, including human beings, are parasites of the plant world. – Isaac Asimov

scutellinia scutellata botany photo day

Scutellinia scutellata. Eyelash pixie cup, eyelash fungus, eyelash cup, scarlet elf cap, Molly eye-winker–all are common names for this diminutive fungus. …This species is common across North America and Europe, and recorded from every continent (yes, even Antarctica). Photo and text via Botany Photo of the Day, UBC Botanical Garden.

amaranthus caudatus

Amaranthus caudatus “Love Lies Bleeding.” Photo AnRo0002, Wikimedia Commons.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: