GRAPEVINE: Lost Bees, Onograceae, Naughty Knautias, May Rain, Toronto Botanical, Regal Rheums, Therese Bugnet, Rock Rose, Pacific Bulbs, Hidcote, Future Food, Cream Indigo

Baptisia bracteata var. leucophaea syn. B. leucophaea at James Woodworth Prairie Preserve, Glenview, IL, USA, 9 May 2006. Photo Frank Mayfield, WikiCommons.

Baptisia bracteata var. leucophaea syn. B. leucophaea at James Woodworth Prairie Preserve, Glenview, IL, USA, 9 May 2006. Photo Frank Mayfield, WikiCommons.

The greatest fine art of the future will be the making of a comfortable living from a small piece of land. ― Abraham Lincoln

Hidcote Manor, April 30 2014. Photo HARTLEPOOLMARINA2014, via Wikimedia Commons.

Hidcote Manor, April 30 2014. Photo HARTLEPOOLMARINA2014, via Wikimedia Commons.

U.S. beekeepers lost 40 percent of bees in 2014-15
The survey is part of a larger research effort to understand why honey bee colonies are in such poor health, and what can be done to manage the situation. Colony losses present a financial burden for beekeepers, and can lead to shortages among the many crops that depend on honey bees as pollinators. Some crops, such as almonds, depend entirely on honey bees for pollination. Estimates of the total economic value of honey bee pollination services range between $10 billion and $15 billion annually.
Science Daily

Onagraceae – The Evening Primrose Family
In the site we present a full checklist of all taxa within each of the 18 recognized genera as well as diagnostic images for as many taxa as possible.
Smithsonian 

Nice and Naughty Knautias
Occasionally, one has a nice plant that does well in your garden but is overlooked by many gardeners.  Such plants often serve the triple purposes of a conversation piece, an educational opportunity, and a bragging item.  Such is the place occupied by Knautia macedonia in my garden.
Garden Musings 

May Rain
We have had an astonishing amount of rain in the past three weeks. Steady and generous rain. Lately that rain has been accompanied by very warm temperatures.  Timing is everything-as someone once said.  I am watching what regular spring rain and a little heat is meaning to my plants. All of my evergreens, shrubs and perennials are putting on a lot of weight.  I am delighted with the look.
Dirt Simple

The Toronto Botanical Gardens – Part Two
As mentioned in my previous blog, the TBG is a botanical garden still in its infancy. It covers only a small area around the entrance to the building, and this is divided into even smaller, pocket gardens. I suppose this is almost unavoidable for public gardens like the TBG whose mandate it is to educate – they try to have a bit of everything in an attempt to satisfy every kind of visitor.
The Garden Wanderer

Regal Rheums
I love rhubarb. This perennial vegetable thrived in the temperate New England climate in which I grew up, and one of my earliest garden memories was in a rhubarb patch. I remember running into the vegetable garden every summer to select the fattest, reddest stalks, and, after peeling away and discarding its poisonous leaves, I would chew on the raw stems until the acidic flavor became too astringent.
In Season

‘Thérèse Bugnet’ Rose in Bloom
The wisdom of growing plenty of plants that think that even your worst Winters are an insult to real Winters everywhere has never been clearer. Rosa ‘Thérèse Bugnet’ is so hardy it thrives in sub-Arctic Canada. No cold weather in the Lower 48 will faze it.
Louis The Plant Geek

It’s Not All About the Plants
I’d seen a cardinal flying through the narrow space between the potting shed and greenhouse but just thought she was passing through. Then one day I was working in the potting shed with the doors open and I kept hearing this one note call. As I peered through the door I saw a female cardinal was busy building a nest on the little espaliered yaupon holly growing up the side of the greenhouse.
Rock Rose

Pacific Bulb Society
The Pacific Bulb Society (PBS) was organized in Spring 2002 for the benefit of people who garden with bulbs. This includes both cold hardy and tender bulbs, and all the bulbs in between. By ‘garden with’ we also mean to include plants, shrubs, and even trees that we grow as companions to our bulbs. Membership in PBS is open to bulb lovers around the world.
PBS

Hidcote Manor Garden – Paradise Lost and Found in the Cotswolds
When I first visited Hidcote Manor in Gloucestershire several years ago on a hot summer morning in June. It was nothing short of a nightmare! The car park was heaving with coaches, it was over-run with visitors and I came away feeling that I’d been short-changed at a garden theme park … But if you consider that Hidcote and Sissinghurst are to England, what Giverny and Villandry are to France in terms of drawing garden visitors, it is not surprising.
The Galloping Gardener/Charlotte Weychan

Feeding Tomorrow’s Billions: Lab-Grown Meat Products, Vertical Farms, AI-Designed Recipes, and More
Food and agriculture accounts for about 5.9% of the global GDP. Global food retail sales alone account for about $4 trillion/year, and food accounts for 15% of what American households spend each year. It is an industry ripe for disruption.
Singularity Hub

Baptisia bracteata var. leucophaea
Cream false indigo is an exquisite perennial, 1-2 ft. tall with a wide, bushy habit. The branches cascade under the weight of the sometimes foot-long flower spikes. The leaves are alternate, 1 1/2–4 inches long, divided into 3 distinct segments; but the stipules are so large that they are sometimes mistaken for leaves.
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Rosa 'Therese Bugnet'. Photo Ulf Eliasson, WikiCommons.

Rosa ‘Therese Bugnet’. Photo Ulf Eliasson, WikiCommons.

When people will not weed their own minds, they are apt to be overrun by nettles. ― Horace Walpole

Rheum officinale, Polygonaceae, Chinese Rhubarb, habitus. Karlsruhe, Germany. Photo H. Zell via WikiCommons.

Rheum officinale, Polygonaceae, Chinese Rhubarb, habitus. Karlsruhe, Germany. Photo H. Zell via WikiCommons.

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