GRAPEVINE: Topiary Pearl, African Monticello, African Kitchen, African Botany, African Seeds, Poor Quince, Prairie Lass, Mutating Fern, Wild Fennel

Susan Hill's sculpture "The Giant's Head" in the Lost Gardens of Heligan. Photo Patche99z, WikiCommons.

Susan Hill’s sculpture “The Giant’s Head” in the Lost Gardens of Heligan. Photo Patche99z, WikiCommons.

“There is no try. There is only do and not do.” – Yoda

Photo of a garden nearby South Street Seaport in New York City. Taken by Shengzhi Li on April 2005. Photo WikiCommons.

Photo of a garden nearby South Street Seaport in New York City. Taken by Shengzhi Li on April 2005. Photo WikiCommons.

Topiary Gardens by a Man Named Pearl
Bishopville, South Carolina is home to less than 3,500 people, yet last year it was host to more than 15,000 visitors. They traveled to this small, impoverished town to wander the gardens of a man named Pearl. There, on a former cornfield that was cleared in 1981, you will find the Pearl Fryar Topiary Garden.
My Black Journey

African-American Gardens at Monticello
Wormley Hughes, the African American often called Monticello’s “Head Gardener,” collected seed, planted precious plants in the Monticello nurseries, and set out Mr. Jefferson’s “pet trees.” Gardener John espaliered grapes, aided in the terracing of the kitchen garden, and planted a sugar maple tree that survived for 200 years…
Twinleaf Journal Online

If You Want to Grow a Healthy African American Kitchen Garden–Here are Your Marching Orders
Let me say this first–in the African, African Diaspora and African American cultural traditions have long embraced the kitchen garden as an essential piece of daily life.  Don’t let the new crop of food advocates and activists fool you–this is a tradition that our Ancestors established, cultivated and fought for…Before anyone ever heard of a Victory Garden we had our truck and huck patches, which served as a means of cultural, economic and social power in the slave quarter through the age of the Freedmen and segregation.
Afroculinaria

A Renaissance for African Botanic Gardens?
If botanical gardens are going to demonstrate their value as resources for sustainable development, it is in Africa they will do so. The African botanical gardens have had a hard ride. Many were established by the old colonial powers, under which they flourished until the financial and political upheavals of post-colonial Africa reduced them to under-resourced shells. Today, that pattern of decline is being reversed as many African nations rise to the challenge of the Convention on Biological Diversity and produce strategies that recognize the need for retaining plant resources.
Virtual Herbarium

The Seeds of Survival
The broader truth is that gardening is a lost tradition in many African-American communities. The National Gardening Association doesn’t tally the number of black gardeners — nor, it would seem, does anyone else.
New York Times

In Praise of the Misunderstood Quince
As long ago as 1922, the great New York pomologist U. P. Hedrick rued that “the quince, the ‘golden apple’ of the ancients, once dedicated to deities, and looked upon as the emblem of love and happiness, for centuries the favorite pome, is now neglected and the least esteemed of commonly cultivated tree-fruits.” Almost every Colonial kitchen garden had a quince tree.
New York Times

Pretty Prairie Lass
So, should you grow ‘Prairie Lass’?  It seems to be a nice rose and bush and is healthy enough to keep a place for it in a collection of Buck roses. But I don’t think it is a rose that will ever make a garden visitor gasp in surprise.
Garden Musings

Distant species produce ‘love child’ fern after 60-million-year breakup
A delicate woodland fern discovered in the mountains of France is the love child of two distantly-related groups of plants that haven’t interbred in 60 million years, genetic analyses show. Reproducing after such a long evolutionary breakup is akin to an elephant hybridizing with a manatee, or a human with a lemur, the researchers say.
Science Daily

Wild Fennel; Foeniculum vulgare
Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) is an erect perennial herb, four to ten feet tall, with finely dissected, almost feathery leaves and characterized by a strong anise scent originating from stems and leaves. The flowers are yellow and small (one-quarter inch across), and are clustered in large, rounded, umbrella-like groups (compound umbels), roughly four inches across, that are conspicuous from April through July.
Eat The Weeds

Common box (Buxus sempervirens), the two sides of the same branch. Photo Didier Descouens WikiCommons.

Common box (Buxus sempervirens? koreana?), the two sides of the same branch. Photo Didier Descouens WikiCommons.

“What you think, you become.” – Buddha

Forsythia hedge at Dumbarton Oaks. Photo at Hedge Britannia, click image to link.

Forsythia hedge at Dumbarton Oaks. Photo at Hedge Britannia, click image to link.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: