GRAPEVINE: Lady Bird, California Poppy, Fortingall Yew, Tremolat, Moutiers, Oz Wigandia, Palomar Wigandia, Moving Lilacs, Bad Kitty, OK Kitty, Stink Bug, Guest Pests, Home Movie

Edgeworthia chrysantha, a winter-deciduous member of the Thymelaeaceae family (Daphne, Camellia), in discreet and powerfully fragrant winter bloom. Photo by Daniel Mosquin via Botany Photo of the Day. Click image to link to that excellent site.

Edgeworthia chrysantha, a winter-deciduous member of the Thymelaeaceae family (Daphne, Camellia), in discreet and powerfully fragrant winter bloom. Photo by Daniel Mosquin via Botany Photo of the Day. Click image to link to that excellent site.

Eschsholzia californica, the California Poppy. In the Antelope Valley of southern California, these beautiful poppies cover the landscape as far as the eye can see. Photo Johnathan Stegeman. Click image to link to Wikimedia Commons.

Eschsholzia californica, the California Poppy. In the Antelope Valley of southern California, these beautiful poppies cover the landscape as far as the eye can see. Photo Johnathan Stegeman. Click image to link to Wikimedia Commons.

“Earth laughs in flower” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
Lady Bird Johnson, our former first lady, and actress Helen Hayes founded an organization in 1982 to protect and preserve North America’s native plants and natural landscapes. First as the National Wildflower Research Center and later as the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, this special place exists to introduce people to the beauty and diversity of wildflowers and other native plants.
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

California Poppy, Eschscholzia californica
California poppy is often used in wildflower mixes. It is easy to grow, drought tolerant, and reseeds so readily that is can become weedy. In natural conditions, it blooms most heavily from March to May. This bloom period can be extended with supplemental water.      Native Plant Database, LBJWC

The Fortingall Yew
The Fortingall Yew is an ancient yew (Taxus baccata) in the churchyard of the village of Fortingall in Perthshire, Scotland. Various estimates have put its age at between 2,000 and 5,000 years; recent research into yew tree ages suggests that it is likely to be nearer the lower limit of 2,000 years.     Wikipedia

Box and Yew at Tremolat
Someone is doing a good job of clipping perfect spheres. I love the ‘green’ in the garden at Le Vieux Logis, a grand old hotel in Tremolat, Dordogne.   Our French Garden

Le Parc du Bois des Moutiers, Normandy, France
The partnership between Edwin Lutyens and Gertrude Jekyll ranks as one of the most famous in gardening. He was the architect, she the gardener. He provided the garden layout and designed the structures and spaces, while she filled them in with billowing herbaceous plantings that have become synonymous with the “English garden”.      The Garden Wanderer

Wigandia Garden, Australia
Wigandia is the name of William Martin’s four-acre garden, which he calls his “private adventure ground,” in Victoria, Australia. A one-of-a-kind garden, Wigandia is an astonishing, otherwordly place where foliage trumps flowers and water is never wasted.     Wigandia

Plants With Stinging Trichomes
About ten years ago, a small specimen of Wigandia caracasana was planted by Mr. Wolffia in an unlandscaped area between the Life Sciences Greenhouse and the Staff Building at Palomar College. The hard, sun-baked ground was devoid of topsoil and it was doubtful that this little plant could survive in its new home. But to the astonishment of the Life Sciences staff, survive it did.
Wayne’s Word

Moving mature lilacs
Lilacs, even 40-year-old plants, can be transplanted at most any time of the year if done properly. The best time, however, is when they are dormant or not growing, generally in the fall, late summer or early spring (in that order of preference).     John L. Fiala, Lilacs: A Gardener’s Encyclopedia; via Google Books

That Cuddly Kitty Is Deadlier Than You Think
“We were absolutely stunned by the results.” The study appeared Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications. The findings are the first serious estimate of just how much wildlife America’s vast population of free-roaming domestic cats manages to kill each year.     New York Times

In Defense of Garden Cats
As a gardening veterinarian, I feel obligated to defend our feline friends against the recent onslaught of poor publicity directed towards them.  I’m referring of course, to news reports that stem from a January 29, 2013 article by Scott Loss, et al in Nature Communications, titled “The impact of free-ranging domestic cats on wildlife of the United States”.     Garden Musings

Stink Bug: Combating a Top-Ranked Invasive Insect
First detected in the United States a decade ago, the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is now in at least 39 states, wreaking havoc in homes and gardens, and is a major economic threat to orchard fruits, garden vegetables and row crops.     Science Daily

Exactly what wildlife do we want overwintering in our beds?
What beneficial or pesky critters and diseases could be encouraged by a nice thick layer of leaf litter among perennials?  Inquiring gardeners want to know!     Garden Rant

Home movie (01:33:18)
Spectacular aerial photography of our changing planet. To disseminate their message, the producers placed the film in the public domain, available through the Internet Archive. Surprisingly, this high-budget film was funded by major international fashion and apparel corporations.     archive.org

“Flowers always make people better, happier, and more helpful: they are sunshine, food and medicine to the soul.” – Luther Burbank

Aerial view of glacial flow in Greenland. Screen shot from movie "Home," in the public domain.

Aerial view of glacial flow in Greenland. Screen shot from movie “Home,” in the public domain.

 

Aerial view of cultivated fields in Bangladesh. Screen shot from movie "Home," in the public domain.

Aerial view of cultivated fields in Bangladesh. Screen shot from movie “Home,” in the public domain.

 

Aerial view of cultivated Eucalyptus forest in South America. Not a good thing. Screen shot from movie "Home," in the public domain.

Aerial view of cultivated Eucalyptus forest in South America. Not a good thing. Screen shot from movie “Home,” in the public domain.

 

Aerial view of Arctic ice cap. Screen shot from movie "Home," in the public domain.

Aerial view of Arctic ice cap. Screen shot from movie “Home,” in the public domain.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: